Corrupt! Self-serving! Inauthentic! People don't have a lot of nice things to say about today’s politicians. But there’s a quality they share that may be worse than all of these, one thing that seems to connect them all, regardless of party or ideology - the disease of short-term thinking. Maybe it’s not all their fault. We live in a quick-fix society. One that privileges convenience over quality; satiation over substance. America’s large corporations used to stand unique in the world with their commitment to R and D and long-term investment: think ATT’s Bell Labs or Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center. Today those companies are committed to the next quarterly earnings report, beholden to shareholders who measure return on investment with the patience of a day-trader’s mouse click. In the public sector, we have Congress after Congress, setting the bar ever lower for productivity. Elected officials obsess over their re-election before they’re even elected and the epidemic of privileging politics over national priorities shows no sign of abating. It wasn’t always this way. Our national history is marked by political leaders whose vision greatly exceded their term of office, in many cases their lifetimes. Henry Clay’s American System proposed a concerted national investment in commerce and transportation infrastructure at the dawn of the industrial age. Teddy Roosevelt’s National Parks built an investment in natural capital, one whose economic returns we continue to enjoy today. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Interstate Highway system and the bi-partisan legislators that approved it, became the greatest public works project in human history and the single largest economic driver of the twentieth century. In contrast, the consequences of today's shortsightedness are everywhere apparent. Our aging infrastructure, designed for the previous century, is decaying; our financial sector resists real reform even in the wake of the last, wholly preventable crisis; and our notoriously inefficient health care system perversely incentivizes illness instead of fostering wellness. A hallmark of great civilizations is their ability to build for the long-term – think Roman aqueducts and the land grant colleges – and it is time for us to demand that our leaders today set-aside their politics and help usher in a new era of long-term thinking and investment in our deep future. That is why this election season we say, Carpe Millennium! Look for this site to help further the conversation in the coming days and years…